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>>> tonight on "worldfocus" -- >> in india, swine flu has triggered a wave of panic with schools, theaters and shopping malls shutting down. tonight we investigate the health threat there and elsewhere. is the flu fear justified? >>> glimmer of hope. surprising numbers show germany and france have pulled out of recession. could the rest of europe be far behind? and what does that mean for the u.s. economy? >>> as secretary of state clinton meets with the first woman president of liberia, we look at the women's movement in that west african country. a force so strong, it drove a dictator from power. >>> and we continue our look at the impact of climate change on remote lands. traveling to cambodia to meet the monks out to save a forest one tree at a time. >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. we are going to start here tonight with a subject that has a lot of people here and throughout the world increasingly concerned as we heard towards fall that. subject is the h1n1 swine flu virus, which according to the world health organization has killed just under 1,500 people worldwide. ri
to death in india for planting bombs that killed 52 in the city of mumbai in 2003. all three were convicted last week six years after bombs exploded at the gateway of india monument in the main corridor. our correspondent there reports now. >> the attack in mumbai in august 2003 was the victim. the bombs were planted inside two taxis. one detonated as -- at the city's main jewelry market at the height of the business hour, leaving behind a trail of destruction. the second at the city's main landmark. it was the gateway of india. more than 50 people were killed and nearly 180 wounded. last week, a special anti-terror court convicted this man, his wife, and usherethis person of planting the bombs. they stood in court as the judge handed them the death penalty. all three have pleaded not guilty and are expected to appeal against the sentence. their trial took place in high security and under a powerful anti-terrorism law that no longer exists. prosecutors argued that the bombings were carefully planned and were an act of extreme brutality. all three deserved the harsh sentence, they said. the
countries - brazil, russia and india. the bric four was actually once expected to reshape the global economy. but in today's extraordinary climate, that seems like wishful thinking in better times. this is the growth expected from china; while in neighbouring india, the economic fundamentals are also strong. but brazil has stumbled with no clear growth expected until 2010; and as for russia - over reliant on high commodity prices it now risks the spectre of high inflation and high unemployment. and the bric fault lines don't only concern numbers. for its members are fierce competitors and serious mistrust abounds - which is a barrier to enhancing trade and economic cooperation. >>zweig: well the chinese don't trust the indians at all. the indians don't trust the chinese. the 1962 border war seared, forever seared, the brains of indian policy makers. brazilian businessmen complain, over the last couple of years that china came - hu jintao the leader of china visited - promised all kinds of money, left - and then everybody said, where's the money? >>reporter: it's one of those strange historic
looking at 8% this year. >> this year. so maybe up to 9, maybe -- >> well,. >> and india is doing the same, do you think or is that -- >> i don't know. mi far less familiar with what is going on. but i think having had the election in india which the first time has given them a pretty strong mandate in the government, i think they will be able to move ahead much more easily than in the past where there have been so many political factions fighting to try and be on top of things. so i think india has the ability now to get into much stronger position than it was in beforehand. >> most people look at india and china as leading the economic recovery. and perhaps brazil coming in and then the united states and they see europe lagging. >> well, i would agree with you about this. china, india, brazil. i think they are already showing it. they are already goinging that far. 9 united states knew far better than i how things are going. but you still see both in the united states and in europe news of job layoffs and although the financial sector seems to be in less bad shape, let's put it that way,
into the g8 and then you go to g9 and india and brazil will say what about us? so maybe you need a g11. >> i didn't hear russia in there. >> russia's already in the g8. you read it. >> china clearly is on at sent, particularly -- on the assent, particularly on economics. they are spreading their tentacles now into central and south america, reinvigorating relationships with chavez and the castro brothers in cuba. they are also reaching deep into africa and the middle east. so we've got to watch them strategically as well as economically. >> so exit question, is it obsolete or not, the g8? >> no, it's not but it will have to be slowly enlarged to include india and probably brazil. >> i'm not advocating a g2. i'm just saying china and the u.s. have to be partners in a lot of areas. >> i agree. >> the vice president of the united states is encouraging the china/u.s. relationship. she deserves a lot of credit. >> new york the secretary of state. >> excuse me, the secretary of state. >> right. >> there's been renewed interest in asia since barack obama came to power. hillary clinton's been to sou
security relationships that span connect decades. india's relationship with russia, is a key factor driving new delhi to turn toward washington. but the system is in need of reform. obama administration seems to want to re-engineer it and while still keeping u.s. systems from those who shouldn't have them and do so in a manner that gains kregsal support. thank you for joining us, i'll be back next sunday morning at 11:00. have a great week. fios tv, internet and phone for just $79.99 a month. oh, all right, see... you're just moving your fingers aren't you? i've gotta cut my nails. (announcer) now get three amazing fios services for the price of two. tv, internet, and phone for only... plus a free multi-room dvr for three months. record shows in one room- watch in another. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities at 800.974.6006 tty/v before september 19th. and get fios tv - ranked highest in overall customer satisfaction by j.d. power and associates
to micromanage what we can and cannot do in our lives. neil: we have a monsoon in india, and we have had adverse weather that was affecting the price of this stuff long before the rumors of what the administration was trying to do on imports. >> you are right. this is a longstanding bonehead policy we have had of having price supports that makes sense only for political reasons because they help the farmers in the upper midwest and cane farmers, but the fact is we are now at a crisis point. world prices are the highest they have been in 30 years -- oil prices are the highest they have been in 30 years. we are still paying a boat load in the u.s. because of these policies we have. neil: you can educate me. is it what they are doing or what countries like brazil are doing, you know, shipping a lot of their attention to at an all -- ethanol and taking a lot of corn out of the market? i talked about the weather in india and how that is affecting things. that may be where they are looking at a plot where there might not be one. >> i do not think it is a plot. i would not go that far, and the biggest
india. we learned from democrat senator claire mccaskill that, quote, if we go too far with this, that is cap and trade, then all we are going to do is chase more jobs to china and india where they've been putting up coal-fired plants every 10 minutes. in sum, we have a slew of hearings in three unsuccessful votes on the senate floor. actually i'd say four because we rejected the kyoto treaty in the beginning. the democrats taught us that cap and trade is a great big tax and will raise electricity prices on consumers i would have to say in a regressive way, send jobs to china and india all without any impact on global temperature, so off we go into the august recess secure in the knowledge that cap and trade is riddled with flaws and that democrats are seriously divided over one of president obama's top domestic policy priorities. and we also know that according to a recent polling the american public is increasingly unwilling to pay anything, as the polling has shown, to fight global warming. but all this does not mean cap and trade is dead and gone. it's very much alive as demo
-- the manufacturing jobs that were in america and were moved to countries like india and china. i think that they are experiencing an industrial revolution much like what we saw in the 20th-century. i think that they are developing a middle-class while we are losing our middleclass. i also think that for an economy to do well, there has to be a strong middle-class. that is indicative when you look at consumer spending indexes. we just don't have the money. we don't have the dollars because we don't have manufacturing jobs that developed are middle-class. guest: that is exactly right. that is the essence of the book, which is that china and india have replicated the success in developing this industrialized economy. by opening of their labor force to more exploitation, it does speak to the myth of gdp. you have a growth but poverty grows at the same time. the loss of manufacturing jobs is really such a central element to both this recession and the declining living standards in terms of the exploitation of people, but declining marriage rates, unraveling of our society and many other cou
and india and they're going to be growing very, very rapidly. >> that's where the fish are. fish where the fishes are, right? $1.33 billion people in china. >> larry, do you see a move of that magnitude over the next two years? i see growth, recovery, a little bit slow. the consumer may be out of the fetal position, but not really doing a whole heck of a lot right now. that's two-thirds of the economy at least. >> we're bullish. i don't know that we're that bullish. that's a lot to expect given how far we've come. i think you're right. the consume ser truliry weak. retail sales rely lousy. let me put it this way though you. need a weak consumer to prevent a real recovery. in other words, a few quarters of 5 or 6% growth but the consumer comes after the labor market gets going. i think the risk is you get a normal recovery. people are surprised. that will keep this market going. down the road in a couple years, i think where you run into trouble, they've got at some point they have to withdraw some of the stimulus. we can't run these deficits. that's why i'm not so bullish to say 50% hi
countries, brazil, india, russiaa, china. russia is still one of the ones you want to be invested? i recognize as oil goes higher it's positive but russia was sort of the outlier there for a little while. >> i'd say we're most focused, you know, at morgan stanley investment management we have an investment emerging markets portfolio manager rushi sharma. i agree with him. we very much like the india story. i'm probably a little more positive on brazil. but we want to stay in the big liquid countries. and we also have a positive bias toward some of the smaller countries where we're seeing catch-up, things like turkey. but there's a lot of interesting things going on in the u.s. versus global. take china versus the u.s. right now. china's financials are trading at almost three times book. the u.s. financials are trading at one times book. and in the near term i think the chinese banks will continue to do well, but ultimately they're going to participate price the way u.s. banks did from excessive lending along the way. there's going to be opportunity we do long, we do long short, and t
with india for 60 a ton. these stocks have value that i think a lot of the analysts have missed. technically watch the stock today, a break of 99, very bullish for potash. >>> do you guy or sell, dr. j? >> i would like to see us get softer into the tail end of today. think we ease into tomorrow setting up nicely for a surprise on friday. >> you called me michelle again. >> well, michelle, i think -- >> well, dave, what do you think? >> nice. >> i was a buyer going into yesterday, got even going home. i'm a seller today. i think there's some problems. i'm a little bit short right now, will get a little shorter. >> what do you say? >> melissa, i would say that i'm a seller going into market today. >> tom? >> yeah, tommy tells you this market is going higher, sit tight and maggie, i hope everything goes well for you. >> it's tim, dr. j., dennis and daniel hughes. do not miss, tonight we're going to talk about cisco on the yaf hours trade. a power lunch debate. is twitter in trouble? michelle, what is on tap there? >> you notice how many names begin with m on this network. >> chances are if you
its emissions an china and india aren't, that they can opt out of the legislation. bret. bret: steve brown live in des moines. thanks. a civilian employee from fort louis army base in washington is at the center of a case over constitutional rights of speech and free assembly over over the government's concern over a group that engamed in civil disobedience. correspondent dan springer picked up the story r >> as anti-war groups tried to block this shipment of military equipment from ports in washington state to iraq and afghanistan, they had no idea a spy had infiltrated the ranks. now they are building a case against the man they knew as peace activist john cake could be, who is, in fact, john towery, a civilian army employee assigned to protection division at port arthur, washington. >> i sense a sense of betrayal. i felt like i lost a friend, and in reality, i did. >> the port militarization e assistance, or p.m.r. claims towery, a member of the group for two years and manages an e-mail list was illegally reporting and monitoring activities to police. the group broke his cover thr
negotiation going on between india and china that could short term hurt the stocks. i don't dislike mosaic, i just like potash better. if you're bullish, consider adp and paychecks. those are the great recovery plays. paychecks is better because it's got that hefty yield. after the break i'll try to make you even more money. >>> hoping to give your portfolio the golden touch? cramer goes one on one with eldorado's ceo to find out if his stock can shine on the executive position. >>> and later, try to keep up with cramer as he takes your calls rapid fire in an all-new "lightning round." >>> plus, how do your stock stack up in a mystifying market? cramer makes sure your portfolio make the grade on "am i diversified?" all coming up on "mad money." he ran off with his secretary! she's 23 years old! - oh, come on. - enough! you get half and you get half. ( chirp ) team three, boathouse? ( chirp ) oh yeah-- his and hers. - ( crowd gasping ) - ( chirp ) van gogh? ( chirp ) even steven. - ( chirp ) mansion. - ( chirp ) good to go. ( grunts ) timber! ( chirp ) boss? what do we do with the shih-tzu?
seng fell 2 1/2%. shanghai composite down 2.9%. india's bombay sensex is down. guy? >> narc, the get go of the session, we were in negative territory. you follow what happened in asia. payroll has changed that all around. you are seeing the futures numbers. you can see it as we speak acro across europe. we've now got most of the main markets trading in positive territory. let me show you the spike we got in the stoxx 600. this is the story, instantaneous reaction to that number. stoxx 600 is trading at a session high here in europe. we are up by 1%. as you can see, most of the morning spent in negative territory. let me talk about some of the stories that aren't moving the market over on our side of the pond. royal bank, very negative today. much more negative than anticipated. it missed on the metrics today with its figures. the real thing that struck the market, though, was the comments that came out of steven, the ceo. i spoke with him first thing this morning. he was much more cautious than lloyd was earlier on this week. he is talking about two years at least in terms of getting th
%. but those markets, china, brazil, and india are up substantially more than that. so they have been the leaders in terms of investment performance. and when we start to see cracks in these markets, and i think we're going to continue to see some cracks, they're way ahead of themselves. >> okay. >> it's going to impact our market. >> don, you want to answer that? >> i think he's a little too pessimistic about this. it's going to be volatile. but it's a small market compared to ours. it's an important indicator of sentiment here. but it is not really a competitor for the kind of institutional investors that are dominant in our market or are dominant in japan or the european markets and not a good indicator for individual investors here either. >> okay. >> the way individual investors participate in china is in those chinese stocks that trade in america. >> okay. new topic. bob, housing data very strong today, what about the housing stocks? is that some place you're willing to go to? they've had tremendous runs, is it all priced in? >> i think most of it is priced in. we still have a w
. there is a price negotiation going on between india and china that could short term hurt the stocks. i would use any opportunity to buy them. i don't hate mosaic, i like potash better. if you're bullish, consider adp and paychecks. those are the great recovery plays. paychecks is better because it's got that hefty yield. after the break i'll try to make you even more money. >>> hoping to give your portfolio the golden touch? cramer goes one on one with eldorado's ceo to find out if his stock can shine on the executive position. >>> and later, try to keep up with cramer as he takes your calls rapid fire in an all-new "lightning round." >>> plus, how do your stock stack up in a mystifying market? cramer makes sure your portfolio make the grade on "am i diversified?" all coming up on "mad money." i'm racing cross country in this small sidecar, but i've still got room for the internet. with my new netbook from at&t. with its built-in 3g network, it's fast and small, so it goes places other laptops can't. i'm bill kurtis, and wherever i go, i've got plenty of room for the internet. and the nation's f
congress on issues related to india, pakian, afanistan and the u.s. image abroad. she taube-- coach share the working group, an independent bipartisan working group made up of a handful of u.s. experts the publhed aept in september of 2008 entitled, the u.s. and pakistan, the next cpter. the for joining heritage she was a profeional staff member of the senate foreign relations committee where she handled the portfolio for the committee chairman senator richard lugar. from 2001 to 2003, she serd as a senior adviser in the state department of south asia beau or she buys the sifton secretary on india, pakistan relations. in the late 1990 she servedith the central intelligence agency as a political analyst on south asia. she so served as a political officer to the u.s. embassies i islamabad in new delhi in the early 1990's, where she earned a maritime-- meritorious honor award from the state department as well as the honors for her anytical work on indo-pakistani relations. most recently she visited afghanistan in late june as part of a nato opinion leade delegation. speaking just before her
, and india, and brazil, as long as they are there, been the fta problem is marginal. and then you have done doha round, it essential to poor countries and i think american farmers and ranchers have a bad case that their industry is more restricted and limited by foreign trade and any other. but agriculture is 8% of american exports. it is not going to grow even if there is a successful doha round. i think the administration goes to the public and say that we want to push for doha just as it is, the public should say the president is a smart guy and we trust him. given that trade is a dissident and difficult issue within the democratic party, i think that if the administration is going to make a big push for trade and spend capital on it, it has to have a different agenda that will do more for america as an economy and do more for our national security goals as a nation. let me give three points from my paper that i would like to say. one is, we need to look harder at ourselves and our own policies. they are not very good. if you look at the american system, we collect $25 million of tariffs
, crop shortages in this brazil and india, big talk. tradertalk.cnbc.com. >> bob, technology still holding up, nasdaq up 7.5 points. i take you to wall and show you big cap technology stocks. the story today dictated by apple. barclays capital raising the price target to 208 from 188, not only like the product line but free cash flow. stocks up 1.75%. microsoft strong, as well, 1%, talking about the zzunor next month. look at what is happening in the chips base. 1% for the semiconductor index, names internally within that intel, qualcomm, and r.w. baird. palm, jim goldman was telling you on the menu, smart phones, palm is up 4%, despite the fact it was cut to sell at morgan joseph, and an upgrade at morgan keegan. >> the question we often ask so many times, what's driving crude oil? we have two charts here that really put it in focus. first take a look at oil versus the dollar. the dollar has been down all day, but it's been so steady and you see the volatility in oil. so, okay, now flip it. take a look at oil versus the s&p 500. it's pretty clear, based just on those charts, and t
on the india business report. >> following it up from asia, down by 50 points for the nifty right now. almost over 1%, though it's recovered from the low point of the day. we were staring down by about a 2%. you are seeing heavyweight selling, beat up markets are selling off and you are seeing institutional selling coming in. so reliance industries or in gc, both of these counters are giving off a lot by way of momentum. you have counters from the entire real estate space like unitech and glenn mark pharmaceuticals, that is one count which is in focus and trade today. here is perhaps the reason why. forest labs currently says they did not show positive results in the phase 2b trials pop so any jerk reaction coming in on opening bell. the counter was down about 18 odd percent. still continues to suffer, down about 14% on last count. some bit of recovery in ranbaxy, idn and a couple of other counters which have which has sold off a bit in the last week or so. with that, it's back to you. >> ayesha faridi, thank you very much. and it's back to becky now. >> the world is focusing on the economic
is to say european union, china, japan, maybe in the future brazil, india and so on -- as long as they are not on the ft a-list and the fta program is marginal, then you have the doha round centraltrality o agriculture to it is very important to poor countries and i think ranchers and farmers have the right to say their industry is more limited and restricted by foreign barriers. agriculture is 8 to 10 american exports. it's not going to grow even if there was an successful doha round. if the administration goes to the public and says we want to make a big push for doha at least as it is and for these three ftas, the public will say the president is a smart guy, i can trust him, it's got not much to do with me. and given that trade is a disadvicive and difficulty in the party, if the administration will push trade and spend political capital on it it needs to have a somewhat different agenda that will do more for america as anconomy and do more for our national security goals as a nation. and let me give, i think, three points from my paper that i would like to see.90 one is we
trade, which is to say europe, china, japan, maybe in the future brazil, india and so on, as long as they are not on this fta list and the ogrin is marginal. then you have the doha round. centrality of agriculture to it is very important to poor countries and i think american farm -- farmers and ranchers have a good case to say that their industry is more restricted and more limited by foreign trade barriers than any other. agriculture is about eight or 10% of american exports which is not going to go even if there is a big and successful doha round. so i think if the administration goes to the public and says we want to make a big push for doha at least as it is and for these fta is the public will say the president is a smart guy, i kind of trust in. not got much to do with me. and given that trade is a difficult issue within the democratic party, i think of the administration is going to make a big push for trade, and spend political capital on it, it needs to have a somewhat different agenda that will do more for america as an economy and do more for our national security goal
composite gained 1.7%. on top of 4 1/2% the day before. india's bombay sensex up 1 1/2%. guy johnson, what's happening in europe? >> mark, we are trading higher. i just want to point out that it is on staggeringly like volume. nobody is out there. just take a look at the clips going through the european market are incredibly light at the moment. so when you look at what you're seeing here on the screen, you've got to bear that in mind. i kind of want to walk you around europe and talk about the stories we're watching. in london, justice blackburn ruled today that english courts do not have the jurisdiction to force creditors of lehman europe to accept the wind-up for them. that's highly significant because pwc, pushing through that wind-up order, now says that it could take a decade town wind the assets of lehman europe. bear that in mind when you come up this anniversary which we're rapidly approaching of the lehman collapse. let's go over to germany where all the talk is about what happens with gm europe, opel. talk is this board meeting taking place today with gm. the indications are th
as well as afghanistan, the issue of new beer proliferation, the dangers of four between india and pakistan the contagion o any type of taliban victory into central asia and into the gulf. the implications regionally and globally, should we have to walkway from afghanistan? that i catastrophic. the american public ha to be told and because that will be necessary fo us to sustain our efforts for the amount of time it will take but we are to have realistic expectaons about what we canccomplish but let's t foo ourselves into believing if bin laden were killed tomorrow, that we have the easy exit from afghanistan. >> usually if the awer is said to mo foreign troops, you have probably cost the ong question. th behng said, theurre administraon has no option except for increasinthe commitment. the trend lines are not going thright way and research needs to turn things aroun but we are seeing some progress in afghan security forces, but this is about afghan lives so we will the simp efforts and things ke the economy, a simple covenants the judiciary system and even religion because muc
regions of india and will have higher percentage of voting. to give us some more perspective, specifically in those two provinces, what do you expect the voter turnout to become to give us a perspective on the south and east? > is difficult to predict exactly on the day and measure the number of people who have the confidence you can come forward -- who will have the confidence to come forward. certainly it stands to reason that those people living in areas that have been subject to the most recent security operations will probably fall in one camp or the other pretty readily. they will either relish the opportunity to take part in normal activities, or they might fear that the presence of troops to remove the threat of the insurgents is such that maybe they do not feel secure given that there has been a sense of engagement and activities involving troops and aircraft near the vicinity. i think it is important for them to take part in the activities and move out of their communities and take part in this process. i would think we're looking at and reports from our commanders down south wou
for " the new york times." you traveled with president obama with to india recently. the headline was, obama visits economically depressed region. we were talking to the mayor about jobs and job creation beard what was your take away from the trip and the challenges? guest: we want to the county, not that far from my home town of toledo, ohio, so it felt sort of like going home. it was a relatively small group of 200 people, but most of them were people who had gotten their jobs back after being laid off, in part due, they think, to stimulus money from the federal government in that the stimulus encouraged netstar to come in and buy their own company that had gone bankrupt. host: over the last few weeks as we were beginning to see some upbeat language from the treasury department and the fed about the economy, we keep hearing concerns by economists that this might be a jobless recovery. what does that mean, and how can you have a recovery without more jobs? guest: and that we start from a lower base. we have gone down so far in what some call the great recession, that you can recover, but yo
, but also in india and china. that is the competition. that is the global economy we are in, and we want to make sure that states are doing the best they can to differentiate and to meet these much higher bars as they get developed. secondly, how to reduce teacher quality? we note is not race, not class, not socio-economic status. in fiscal year 2007, 57% of students with disabilities spent 80% or more of their time in regular education classrooms. had we make sure that not just special-education children but each child can be a child a special needs? how we can use this for special development to make sure that we're not putting kids in their basements anymore, that we are mainstreaming, making sure that every teacher has the ability to support those students. how do we do it better job of not burning out our special education teachers? we know how tough an overwhelming that job is and how much paper work there is. there is great turnaround. -- how much paper work there is. how do we change that? -- paperwork. how to reduce the paperwork? how to start being more creative math, science,
of mexico's economic outlook. santiago on my i-india left is the vice president of the answer american development bank, in charge of sectors of kwledge, if you want explanation and stay a few minutes afterwards. he was the chief economist for that, and he has a long distinguished career in mexican public service. he was the overall general director of the mexican social security institute which is a massive public enterprise whose deputy minister at the fince ministry, and he was largely credited with having, if not exactly invented certainly put into practice and orchestrated the opportune, a program. also a very productive scholar at the intellectual, he is putting out more books than i n read. in any event, thanks very much for joining us. santiago. next, e director of sovereign ratings and standard and poor, and responsible for the sovereign analysis in the latin american group. she also teaches part-time at colombia university school of public and international affairs. she worked at the federal reserve board of governors in washington. let me say that the job of the southern rat
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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